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How to Detox Your Home

Homes that are not ventilated enough contain twice as many pollutants.

With over a hundred toxic chemicals we are surrounded by every day, every home can easily turn into a dangerous zone. Since some of the chemicals are invisible and others are without a smell, they are not easy to detect; but if we’re constantly exposed to them even in small doses, eventually they can be hazardous to our health. Furthermore, homes that are not ventilated enough contain twice as many pollutants, while various cleaning products we use to keep the windows, furniture and floors clean, all contain numerous toxic chemicals that can seriously jeopardize our health. Here are some of the most efficient ways to detox your home.

Use green cleaning products

Chemical-filled cleaners are full of toxic chemicals, so it would be a good idea to switch to DIY cleaning supplies. Vinegar, baking soda and lemon juice are perfect for cleaning and they are just as effective as any chemical solvent you’ve used so far. Use vinegar instead of bleach, baking soda is great for scrubbing the tiles, while lemon juice efficiently removes stains. Add vegetable-based liquid soap, washing soda, and tea tree oil to the rest of the ingredients, and you’ll keep the home squeaky clean without the use of harmful chemicals. Furthermore, laundry soap can be a good substitute as well since it’s considered to be a true green cleaning product.

Air the rooms often

Air the rooms often

The longer you keep the windows in your home open, the less stale the air will be in the room. Plants purify the air, so consider decorating the home with a few of them. Fresh flowers or pots with rosemary and sage will add wonderful natural fragrance to the house, and you won’t have to use toxic air fresheners. Air cleaners and purifiers are also invaluable for every home, so invest in them to keep the air in your home toxin-free.

Limit the use of plastic

How to Detox Your Home

Plastic can contain Bisphenol A, which is thought to be one of the risk factors for cancer and Phthalates that are linked to developmental and endocrine problems. Therefore, try to avoid using plastic as much as possible. Don’t buy foods in plastic packaging or wrap it in plastic and avoid microwaving the food in plastic containers as well. Choose BPA-free plastic or glass baby bottles instead. Forget about plastic shower curtains and children’s toys marked with “3” or “PVC”.

Check the gas leaks

Check the gas leaks

Carbon monoxide leaks can cause poisoning and even death if we’re exposed to it for too long. Therefore, it’s imperative that you check the house for any leaks. Inspect gas stoves, gas fireplace, gas water heater and furnaces to make sure you’re safe. Furthermore, if you want to make sure you don’t have any asbestos in your home, make sure you contact professionals for asbestos testing in Melbourne. After the inspection has been performed, you’ll get notified about the further steps of asbestos management.

Use low VOC

Limit the use of plastic

Volatile Organic Compounds are a group of chemicals that easily spread through the air when they vaporize from various sources. VOC compounds are usually found in carpets, home furnishings, cosmetics, cleaning fluids, deodorants, new plastics and electronics, dry-cleaned clothes, air fresheners and various other household items. If we’re exposed to those chemicals for a long time, it can have a negative effect on our respiratory tract, eyes, cause visual disorder as well as a serious damage to our central nervous system. In order to minimize the exposure to VOC, invest in low-VOC paints, solid wood and hardboard. Leave new furniture in the garage for a few days before you bring it inside, so it can ventilate well.

Limiting your exposure to toxic chemicals is essential for your well-being, so try to do it as much as possible. Not only will you reduce the risk of chronic illness, but you’ll also save the planet from the dangerous pollutants.

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Diana Smith, the author of this article, is a full-time mom of two beautiful girls.
Diana is interested in topics related to home improvement and DIY.

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