Share

Top 3 Roofing Options for the Environment and Your Home

Every homeowner should spend some time considering the pros and cons of each type of roof before deciding on what material they would like to use.

Choosing the right roof can have a major impact on the value of your home, your family’s comfort, and the environment. That is why every homeowner should spend some time considering the pros and cons of each type of roof before deciding on what material they would like to use.

1. Slate Tiles

For those who want a roof that will stand the test of time, few options are better than slate tiles. Depending on where you live and how well you care for your roof, the slate tiles could potentially last for 80 years or longer. They are also extremely resistant to fire, and that makes them an excellent option for anyone who lives in an area that is prone to wildfires. One of the biggest disadvantages of slate tiles is the weight. Before the tiles are installed, a roofing contractor, like the professionals at Stevens Roofing Corporation, will first need to inspect your home to ensure that it is sturdy enough for the tiles.

2. Wood Shingles

Many people choose wood shingles because of how beautiful they are, but their benefits go well beyond aesthetics. Most wood roofs are made from cedar shingles, and that particular material acts as an additional layer of insulation. Cedar shingles are the perfect option for homeowners who have begun to notice climbing energy bills during the hottest and coldest months of the year. They are also extremely easy to replace if they become damaged during a storm. Instead of lifting an entire section of the roof, you can generally replace each individual shingle that becomes damaged.

3. Copper

A new copper roof can increase the value of your home by quite a bit, but those who live in a cold climate should speak with a roofing contractor about the pros and cons of metal roofs. Copper roofs are very light, and that makes them an excellent option for areas that receive quite a bit of snow every year. They are also very durable, and some copper roofs will last for 50 years or longer with the proper maintenance. One of the biggest drawback of a copper roof is the noise amplification during storms. Luckily, that issue can be mitigated with the proper installation techniques.

Having a new roof installed is a major investment, and no one wants to look back in five years and realize that they made the wrong decision. Each material has its own clear advantages, and you should be absolutely positive that you have made the right choice before you start the demolition process.

 Emma Sturgis, the author of this post, is a freelance writer from Boston, MA.

(Visited 27 times, 1 visits today)