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Buckyball Moon Rises Over Chicago; Solar-Powered Sculpture Makes City Smile

Recreating the Moon was part of paintings and science fiction till Brooklyn-based artist Spencer Finch thought differently. He has recreated a miniature edition of the Moon, which now finds its place at the rooftop of Art Institute of Chicago. This buckyball structure of Moon that uses LED lights within to emanate white light, sources its energy from the Sun like the real Moon.

The Lunar moniker of the miniature Moon will light upChicagocity all through this Spring. Two photovoltaic panels installed like in a space structure, harvest the energy from Sun during the daytime and make use of it in the night to power the LED lamps.

Finch has been scrupulous about the details of lunar sculpture, which produces luminance in the same color and brightness of the full Moon.

Finch states that he was fascinated by the Moon from very early age, particularly the way its subtle light plays during the nights. Finally, he charted out plans for the lunar sculpture watching the Moon on the full moon days of July.

He used a colorimeter (a device that measures the average color and temperature of light in a definite location) to measure the light intensity of the full Moon overChicago.

He used this data while giving shape to his well appreciated work to recreate the same color factors.

The buckyball structure is made from aluminum and stainless steel fitted internally with LED lights on orange polycarbonate translucent panels. When the Moon is busy reflecting Sun’s light in the night, Finch’s creation dissipates what it has stored during the day. Both are solar power!

The base of sculpture is claimed to be made from relics of the Apollo Lunar Module, used by theUnited Stateson space missions in the 1969–72 period. This is heavily weighed down by lead plates which holds it from being blown away.

If you want to see this priceless article, it will be exhibited on the Bluhm Family Terrace on the roof of the Art Institute of Chicago all the way through April of 2012.

What do you feel?

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